Dr K. Steinhaus: Spring 2015

Office: UP 2004

Office Phone:  (407) 708-2079

Email: steinhausk@seminolestate.edu

Office hours:

Mon/Wed: 8-9, 10:45-12:30

Tues/Thurs: 9:15-11 [Most days also available 1:45-3]

Additional office hours are available by appointment.

For additional research  help contact:

Jeanne Larsen, Humanities Liaison Librarian: larsenj@seminolestate.edu; 407.708.2616


* Western Civ. Two-- Monday/Wednesday 12:30-1:45 Section:

Awesome Map: http://loiter.co/v/watch-as-1000years-of-european-boarders-change/

Reflection Paper due Wednesday 1/28: Next week we will study the rulers, writers, and aristocrats of Europe during the 17th and early 18th centuries. These people all had money and power, but most people were basically peasants. Peasants usually could not read or write to leave diaries, and we have few clues about their lives. Look at the examples of census records (used here as a substitute for parish records like we discussed in class) and estate records. How much can we find out about ordinary lives from these? Should historians use percentages to describe these lives of the everyday laborers and talk about them as a group, should they use statistics and imagination, or should they just figure these are unknowable stories?

Sources for Reflection Paper #1: http://legacy.fordham.edu/Halsall/mod/17france-soc.asp

From Report of the Estates of Normandy (1651)

Saint-Quentin. Of the 450 sick persons whom the inhabitants were unable to relieve, 200 were turned out, and these we saw die one by one as they lay on the roadside. A large number still remain, and to each of them it is only possible to dole out the least scrap of bread. We only give bread to those who would otherwise die. The staple dish here consists of mice, which the inhabitants hunt, so desperate are they from hunger. They devour roots which the animals cannot eat; one can, in fact, not put into words the things one sees.... This narrative, far from exaggerating, rather understates the horror of the case, for it does not record the hundredth part of the misery in this district. Those who have not witnessed it with their own eyes cannot imagine how great it is. Not a day passes but at least 200 people die of famine in the two provinces. We certify to having ourselves seen herds, not of cattle, but of men and women, wandering about the fields between Rheims and Rhétel, turning up the earth like pigs to find a few roots; and as they can only find rotten ones, and not half enough of them, they become so weak that they have not strength left to seek food. The parish priest at Boult, whose letter we enclose, tells us he has buried three of his parishioners who died of hunger. The rest subsisted on chopped straw mixed with earth, of which they composed a food which cannot be called bread. Other persons in the same place lived on the bodies of animals which had died of disease, and which the curé, otherwise unable to help his people, allowed them to roast at the presbytery fire.

From Letters of the Abbess of Port-Royal

(1649) This poor country is a horrible sight; it is stripped of everything. The soldiers take possession of the farms and have the corn threshed, but will not give a single grain to the owners who beg it as an alms. It is impossible to plough. There are no more horses all have been carried off. The peasants are reduced to sleeping in the woods and are thankful to have them as a refuge from murderers. And if they only had enough bread to half satisfy their hunger, they would indeed count themselves happy.

(1652) People massacre each other daily with every sort of cruelty.... The soldiers steal from one another when they have denuded every one else, and as they spoil more property than they carry off, they are themselves often reduced to starvation, and can find no more to annex. All the armies are equally undisciplined and vie with one another in lawlessness. The authorities in Paris are trying to send back the peasants to gather in the corn; but as soon as it is reaped the marauders come to slay and steal, and disperse all in a general rout.

From Cecile Augon, Social France in the XVIIthe Century, (London: Methuen, 1911), pp. 171-172, 189

Read for Wednesday 1/21: The Duc of St-Simon on Versailles http://legacy.fordham.edu/halsall/mod/17stsimon.asp

Read for Monday 1/26: Sources book Peter I Decrees (pages 82-5)

* Western Civ. Two-- Tues./ Thurs. 11-12:15 Section:

Awesome Map: http://loiter.co/v/watch-as-1000years-of-european-boarders-change/

Reflection Paper due Thursday 1/29: Next week we will study the rulers, writers, and aristocrats of Europe during the 17th and early 18th centuries. These people all had money and power, but most people were basically peasants. Peasants usually could not read or write to leave diaries, and we have few clues about their lives. Look at the examples of census records (used here as a substitute for parish records like we discussed in class) and estate records. How much can we find out about ordinary lives from these? Should historians use percentages to describe these lives of the everyday laborers and talk about them as a group, should they use statistics and imagination, or should they just figure these are unknowable stories?

Sources for Reflection Paper #1: http://legacy.fordham.edu/Halsall/mod/17france-soc.asp

From Report of the Estates of Normandy (1651)

Saint-Quentin. Of the 450 sick persons whom the inhabitants were unable to relieve, 200 were turned out, and these we saw die one by one as they lay on the roadside. A large number still remain, and to each of them it is only possible to dole out the least scrap of bread. We only give bread to those who would otherwise die. The staple dish here consists of mice, which the inhabitants hunt, so desperate are they from hunger. They devour roots which the animals cannot eat; one can, in fact, not put into words the things one sees.... This narrative, far from exaggerating, rather understates the horror of the case, for it does not record the hundredth part of the misery in this district. Those who have not witnessed it with their own eyes cannot imagine how great it is. Not a day passes but at least 200 people die of famine in the two provinces. We certify to having ourselves seen herds, not of cattle, but of men and women, wandering about the fields between Rheims and Rhétel, turning up the earth like pigs to find a few roots; and as they can only find rotten ones, and not half enough of them, they become so weak that they have not strength left to seek food. The parish priest at Boult, whose letter we enclose, tells us he has buried three of his parishioners who died of hunger. The rest subsisted on chopped straw mixed with earth, of which they composed a food which cannot be called bread. Other persons in the same place lived on the bodies of animals which had died of disease, and which the curé, otherwise unable to help his people, allowed them to roast at the presbytery fire.

From Letters of the Abbess of Port-Royal

(1649) This poor country is a horrible sight; it is stripped of everything. The soldiers take possession of the farms and have the corn threshed, but will not give a single grain to the owners who beg it as an alms. It is impossible to plough. There are no more horses all have been carried off. The peasants are reduced to sleeping in the woods and are thankful to have them as a refuge from murderers. And if they only had enough bread to half satisfy their hunger, they would indeed count themselves happy.

(1652) People massacre each other daily with every sort of cruelty.... The soldiers steal from one another when they have denuded every one else, and as they spoil more property than they carry off, they are themselves often reduced to starvation, and can find no more to annex. All the armies are equally undisciplined and vie with one another in lawlessness. The authorities in Paris are trying to send back the peasants to gather in the corn; but as soon as it is reaped the marauders come to slay and steal, and disperse all in a general rout.

From Cecile Augon, Social France in the XVIIthe Century, (London: Methuen, 1911), pp. 171-172, 189

Read for Thursday 1/22 : The Duc of St-Simon on Versailles http://legacy.fordham.edu/halsall/mod/17stsimon.asp

Read for Tuesday 1/27: Sources book Peter I Decrees (pages 82-5)

 * Western Civ. One-- Monday/ Wednesday 9:30-10:45 Section:

Awesome Map: http://loiter.co/v/watch-as-1000years-of-european-boarders-change/

Reflection Paper #1 due Wednesday 1/28 (I'll also take them Thursday since I gave the wrong day in class.) Why does Western Civilizations One (essentially European History up to 1600) start with so much talk about ancient civilization in the Middle East and North Africa? Does this make sense to you? Why, or why not? Use facts from the first chapter of the text book or course lecture to back up your opinion!

*Read for Wednesday 1/21: Sources book Two Visions of the City-States and Thucydides on Pericles' Funeral.

*Read for Monday 26 January: Sources book (pages 84-8) Arrian on Alexander the Great

 * Western Civ. One-- Tues./Thurs. 8-9:15 Section:

Awesome Map: http://loiter.co/v/watch-as-1000years-of-european-boarders-change/

Reflection Paper #1 due Thursday 1/29:  Why does Western Civilizations One (essentially European History up to 1600) start with so much talk about ancient civilization in the Middle East and North Africa? Does this make sense to you? Why, or why not? Use facts from the first chapter of the text book or course lecture to back up your opinion!

*Read for Thursday 1/22: Sources book Two Visions of the City-States and Thucydides on Pericles' Funeral.

*Read for Tuesday 27 January: Sources book (pages 84-8) Arrian on Alexander the Great

* Women, Gender, & Culture (Humanities 2322):

If you want to get a head start for next week (1/27 and 1/29), you're welcome to start reading "The Short, Happy Life of Francis Macomber" by Hemingway : http://www.tarleton.edu/Faculty/sword/Short%20Story/The%20Short%20Happy%20Life%20of%20Francis%20Macomber.pdf

Reflection Paper #1 due Thursday 29 January: How has feminism been a useful concept in the past? Is is still useful today? Why, or why not?  OR   In class, we discussed ideas about gender being determined by nature or nurture. Which do you think has a bigger impact, or are both nature and nurture part of our gender? (This paper will probably be mostly opinion-based!)

*Handy Hints:

Here's a half-decent site for comma rules since some students have asked for tips: http://www.grammarbook.com/punctuation/commas.asp