Dr K. Steinhaus: Fall 2014

Office: UP 2004

Office Phone:  (407) 708-2079

Email: steinhausk@seminolestate.edu

Office hours:

Mon/Wed: 10:45-12:30 & 1:45-2:30

Tues/Thurs: 9:15-11. Tuesdays only: 12:15-2

Additional office hours are available by appointment.

For additional research  help contact:

Jeanne Larsen, Humanities Liaison Librarian: larsenj@seminolestate.edu; 407.708.2616


* Western Civ. Two-- Monday/Wednesday 12:30-1:45 Section:

Awesome Map: http://loiter.co/v/watch-as-1000years-of-european-boarders-change/

Attend, and bring ticket stub for extra credit: http://www.orlandoshakes.org/plays-events/les_miserables.html#.VBoWOvldUek​  OR Watch any film version, and write 100 words for extra credit!

Reflection Paper #7 due Wednesday 22 October: As we’ve discussed in class, nationalism was a new idea in Europe after the French Revolution. Describe how it influenced German unification, Italian unification, and the new Austria-Hungary that came from the Holy Roman Empire. Could any of these events have happened without this new spirit of nationalism (especially nationalism based in cultural pride like pride in language)?

Read for Class on Monday 20 October: Alphonse Daudet's "Last Class:" http://www.readbookonline.net/readOnLine/5998/

Reflection Paper #8: (Due Wednesday 29 October) Option One-- World War One is not remembered in the U.S. the way it is in the rest of the world. Why is it so important to the European countries? Why was it groundbreaking? OR Option Two-- Many of the decisions made at the Paris Peace Conference and contained in the Treaty of Versailles ended up failing spectacularly in terms of keeping the world from another war. Describe what went wrong and who might be to blame. Did the European victors refuse to change, was the United States naïve, was Germany a sore loser, or was Central Europe so mixed up that it would inevitably explode again no matter who did what after the First World War?

Wilson's Fourteen Points: http://www.fordham.edu/halsall/mod/1918wilson.html Also, read Sources book: Horrors of War (4th edition pages 226-9 and 3rd edition pages 211-4)

Reflection Paper #9 (Due Thursday 6 November): What are the key ideas behind fascism, and how might these have encouraged the ideology’s spread?

Read the second document on this link (letter to the Central Committee) about gulag life under Stalin: http://history.hanover.edu/courses/excerpts/111stal.html

* Western Civ. Two-- Tues./ Thurs. 11-12:15 Section:

Awesome Map: http://loiter.co/v/watch-as-1000years-of-european-boarders-change/

Attend, and bring ticket stub for extra credit: http://www.orlandoshakes.org/plays-events/les_miserables.html#.VBoWOvldUek​  OR Watch any film version, and write 100 words for extra credit!

Reflection Paper #7 (due Sunday 26 October): As we’ve discussed in class, nationalism was a new idea in Europe after the French Revolution. Describe how it influenced German unification, Italian unification, and the new Austria-Hungary that came from the Holy Roman Empire. Could any of these events have happened without this new spirit of nationalism (especially nationalism based in cultural pride like pride in language)?

Alphonse Daudet's "The Last Class:" http://www.readbookonline.net/readOnLine/5998/

Reflection Paper #8: (Due Thursday 30 October) World War One is not remembered in the U.S. the way it is in the rest of the world. Why is it so important to the European countries? Why was it groundbreaking?

Also, read Sources book: Horrors of War (4th edition pages 226-9 and 3rd edition pages 211-4)

Reflection #9 (Due Thursday 6 November): Many of the decisions made at the Paris Peace Conference and contained in the Treaty of Versailles ended up failing spectacularly in terms of keeping the world from another war. Describe what went wrong and who might be to blame. Did the European victors refuse to change, was the United States naïve, was Germany a sore loser, or was Central Europe so mixed up that it would inevitably explode again no matter who did what after the First World War?

Wilson's Fourteen Points: http://www.fordham.edu/halsall/mod/1918wilson.html Also, read Sources book: Horrors of War (4th edition pages 226-9 and 3rd edition pages 211-4)

Read the second document on this link (letter to the Central Committee) about gulag life under Stalin: http://history.hanover.edu/courses/excerpts/111stal.html

 * Western Civ. One:

Reflection Question #7 (due Thursday 23 October): We talked a lot about the importance of towns. Why did they emerge, and why did they matter so much? Feel free to cite the Magna Carta http://www.fordham.edu/halsall/source/magnacarta.asp in your essay!

Read for the week of October 21/ 23: Sources book (pages 215-226 in 4th edition, but 206-211 and 214-9 in 3rd edition) on Medieval Universities and Courtly Love

Reflection Question #8 (due Thursday 30 October): How did the the Terry Jones video agree or disagree with concepts around knighthood and feudalism (or critiques of feudalism) we've discussed previously in the course? You can write a 1 paragraph essay of 150 words if you include an impressive drawing of a heraldic device or knight!  Also, read excerpt from Boccaccio's Decameron: http://www.fordham.edu/halsall/source/boccacio2.asp

Reflection Question #9 (due Thursday 6 November): We've talked about Britain, France, and several other countries as they moved from the Middle Ages towards the Renaissance. Describe how some of these countries seemed to come closer to unified states with their modern borders, a single monarch, and more centralized governments based on our class sessions this week! I recommend using thoughts about peasants and plagues (demanding more rights post-plague) as at least one example. See the Boccaccio reading and the Walsingham reading in your Sources book (ed 4 pages 259-262/ ed 3 pages 251-4)

* 20th-century Humanities (8-9:15 & 9:30-10:45):

Reflection Paper #7 (due Thursday 22 October): Simon Schama's series is called The Power of Art. Why does he argue Rothko's art is so powerful, and do you agree? Here is a link to the Seagram murals at their final display in London's Tate Modern: http://www.tate.org.uk/servlet/ArtistWorks?cgroupid=999999961&artistid=1875&page=1

Reflection Paper #8 (Due Wednesday 29 October): As we discussed in class, some viewers find pop art celebrates advertising and commercial culture, while others believe it criticizes these things. Which do you believe pop art does, and why? (Note: You can choose both if you want to, but there is no wrong answer.) Please mention at least one of the artists we discussed in class.

Reflection Paper #9 (Due Wednesday 5 November): On Wednesday, we discussed politics and liberation movements, and we’ve discussed politics and history before in class. Why do these things pop up again and again in a Humanities course? (Note: They’re in your text book so it’s not just because I’m a historian teaching the class!!) Explain how one of the movements we discussed in class might be important to art, literature, or music. (This can be a hypothetical example instead of a specific artist, etc., for example, how stirring events might have inspired poets, etc.) You can also use the Great Migration/ the Harlem Renaissance as an example!

* Women, Gender, & Culture (Honors Humanities):

Reflection Paper #6 (due Thursday 16 October): What sorts of roles did women have in creative partnerships we talked about in class? Why do you think there were fewer men in the sorts of roles women had?

For the week of October 20-23: Read second half of Guerrilla Girls text book.

Reflection Paper #7 (Due Thursday 23 October): As we've discussed muses, we've also discussed some (often dysfunctional) relationships that impacted artists or authors’ creativity. What are some examples of these? What do they say about the impact of society’s norms and expectations to influence the creative process?

Reflection Paper #8 (Due Thursday 30 October): Describe some of the ways women and men rebelled against gender norms in the lecture this week. It must have taken extraordinary courage to break away from social conventions. Do you think it is as hard today to do this?

Reflection Paper #9 (Due Thursday 6 November): How is Kehinde Wiley's art an example of "rebellious" work (aka. work that challenges gender, race, and class images presented by the mainstream media)?

BOOK DISCUSSION MEETINGS:

In order to succeed in your Book Discussion Meeting you should be able to do the following 5 things:

  1. Tell me roughly what happens in the book (or the part you've read thus far).

  2. Provide me with a thoughtful opinion of the book. This is personal and need not be the same as mine-- HOWEVER, I'm looking for evidence that you've let yourself think about this book a bit.

  3. Connect the book to gender concepts in the class in some way. You can talk about the author if you choose to do outside research on her (in this case email me a rough list of sources you consulted before/ after our meeting), or you can just talk about the book's contents without doing any research for context. Your decision to outside research or not will NOT impact your grade on this assignment. Instead, it is simply a way that some students may feel more comfortable and prepared, depending on their study habits/ learning styles.

  4. Ask me any questions or concerns you have about the book. Questions of signs of confusion are just evidence to me that you've been thinking about things because #5 is....

  5. Answer any questions I have about what you thought of a theme or scene. These will not be about minute details. A sample question based on the Hemingway story: " So, what did you think of the shooting? Do you think she did it deliberately or not?" Then, you would ideally have something to say back to me without going "what shooting?"

We will choose your second book at the meeting so that the second book will complement the first!!!