Dr K. Steinhaus: Fall 2014

Office: UP 2004

Office Phone:  (407) 708-2079

Email: steinhausk@seminolestate.edu

Office hours:

Mon/Wed: 10:45-12:30 & 1:45-2:30

Tues/Thurs: 9:15-11. Tuesdays only: 12:15-2

Additional office hours are available by appointment.

For additional research  help contact:

Jeanne Larsen, Humanities Liaison Librarian: larsenj@seminolestate.edu; 407.708.2616


* Western Civ. Two-- Monday/Wednesday 12:30-1:45 Section:

Awesome Map: http://loiter.co/v/watch-as-1000years-of-european-boarders-change/

Reflection Question #2 (due Wednesday 10 September): Based on class Wednesday, do you believe absolute monarchy was an effective form of government during the the 17th and 18th centuries? Why, or why not?

Read for Monday 8 September: The Duc de Saint-Simon on the Court of Louis XIV http://www.fordham.edu/halsall/mod/17stsimon.asp

Reflection Question #3 (due Wednesday 17 September): Explain why the Scientific Revolution was so revolutionary (or why it was not!). You can also choose to wait until Monday's lecture, and write instead about why the Enlightenment was or was not revolutionary!

Read for Monday 15 September:  The Ideal of Joseph II http://web.archive.org/web/20000623132851/www.humanities.ccny.cuny.edu/history/reader/josef2ideal.htm

Also, read the Political Testament of Frederick II in the Sources book!!!

Reflection #4 (due Wednesday 24 September): Do you think the French Revolution was a product on Enlightenment thinking? Why, or why not?  You can use the following sources we discussed in class if you like: http://www.fordham.edu/halsall/mod/kant-whatis.html

La Marseillaise: http://www.fordham.edu/halsall/mod/marseill.html
On the Sovereignty of All Nations: 
http://history.hanover.edu/texts/natcon.html

* Western Civ. Two-- Tues./ Thurs. 11-12:15 Section:

Awesome Map: http://loiter.co/v/watch-as-1000years-of-european-boarders-change/

ŃRead for Tuesday: The Duc de Saint-Simon on the Court of Louis XIV http://www.fordham.edu/halsall/mod/17stsimon.asp
Reflection Paper #2 (due Thursday 11 September):

Which of the systems of governments discussed in class this week makes the most sense to you in the context of early modern Europe (aka. At that time in history when there was no government yet like we have today)? What were strengths and weaknesses of the examples we talked about in class? What strengths and weaknesses are evident from the readings?

Read for Tuesday 9 Sept/ Thurs 11 Sept: The Ideal of Joseph II http://web.archive.org/web/20000623132851/www.humanities.ccny.cuny.edu/history/reader/josef2ideal.htm

Reflection Paper #3 (due Thursday 18 Sept.):

Explain why the Scientific Revolution was so revolutionary (or why it was not!). You can also choose to write instead about why the Enlightenment was or was not revolutionary!

Also, read the Political Testament of Frederick II in the Sources book!!!

Reflection #4 (due Thursday 25 September): Do you think the French Revolution was a product on Enlightenment thinking? Why, or why not?  You can use the following sources we discussed in class if you like: http://www.fordham.edu/halsall/mod/kant-whatis.html

La Marseillaise: http://www.fordham.edu/halsall/mod/marseill.html
On the Sovereignty of All Nations: 
http://history.hanover.edu/texts/natcon.html

 * Western Civ. One:

Reflection Question #3 (due Thursday 18 September): In class, we’ve started to talk about the Roman Republic and the Roman Empire under the emperors. Based on what we’ve learned so far, do you believe Ancient Greece had more or less impact than Rome? Why?

Read Roman graffiti examples and excerpt from the Germania by Tacitus in the Sources book for Tuesday and for your paper for 18 Sept.!

Reflection Question #2 (due Thursday 11 September): Based on the course lecture Tuesday and the Michael Woods documentary on Thursday, do you believe Alexander the Great was a great leader? Why, or why not?

Read for Reflection Paper #2: Arrian on Alexander the Great's Campaigns (in your Sources text book)

Reflection Question #4 (due Thursday 25 September): Do the Dark Ages deserve to be called "Dark Ages," or were they underestimated by past historians? You can use the following site (featuring goods from the Sutton Hoo burial) as a reference if you choose! http://www.britishmuseum.org/explore/highlights/highlights_all_relationships.aspx?Title=The+Sutton+Hoo+ship-burial&ContentType=Article&PageId=23565

* 20th-century Humanities (8-9:15 & 9:30-10:45):

 Reflection Question #1 (due Wednesday 3 September): After watching the Rape of Europa, what do you think the actions of men and women during World War II say about the role of art in our society? Is art a political statement, a pressure valve for emotions, a source of beauty, a nation’s heritage, a form of memory, propaganda, or just one individual’s self-expression? Why did art matter to the individuals in the documentary? Do you agree with them?

George Bernard Shaw's Maxims for Revolutionists from Lecture on Wednesday 3 Sept.: http://www.bartleby.com/157/6.html

Reflection Question #2 (due Wednesday 10 September): Do you think the poets and playwrights discussed in class achieved their goal of "making it new" in literature? Why, or why not?

Read for Monday 8 September:  Futurist Manifesto: http://vserver1.cscs.lsa.umich.edu/~crshalizi/T4PM/futurist-manifesto.html

Reflection Question #3 (due Wednesday 17 September): Explain why you believe one (or two) of the individuals discussed Monday or Wednesday in class is particularly influential in his/ her field. It can be a painter, sculptor, composer, or dancer!! (You may want to use the text book to back up your argument or a website-- Cite book page numbers and any websites you use!)

Reflection Question #4 (due 24 September): What ways did the ideas of Freud and Jung have an impact on the painters and sculptors we looked at in class Thursday? Use at least one specific example of an artist discussed in class! Look at the second chapter in your text book (Chapter 33) for reminders of artists we looked at!!!

* Women, Gender, & Culture (Honors Humanities):

Reflection Question #1 (due Thursday 4 September): We discussed different views of gender in class as well as the evolution of feminisms. Describe some of the changes that have taken place in how society views gender. (You can discuss nature vs. nurture and/ or the proto-feminists and different waves of feminism.) Give your opinion on how these ideas/ movements affected (or continue to affect) history and the gender norms in society today.

Also, be sure to select your book by Thursday 4 September, and read the Hemingway short story below:

http://www.tarleton.edu/Faculty/sword/Short%20Story/The%20Short%20Happy%20Life%20of%20Francis%20Macomber.pdf

Reflection Paper #2 (due Thursday 11 September):

In the Hemingway short story, the man’s wife encourages him to embrace a really dangerous form of masculinity. Discuss one of the forms of masculinity we talked about in class, and give your opinion of who enforces/ encourages it and why. Do some of these masculinities help society and others hurt it, or are all labels of what should or shouldn’t be “masculine” just holding us back as individuals? You can use Tough Guise to illustrate your point in your argument!

Reflection Paper #3 (due Thursday 18 Sept): Compare and contrast at least 2 types of masculinity discussed in class. How do these demonstrate masculinity as a concept that's changed over time? How do these demonstrate masculinity as something that's stayed the same?

Also, read for next week (Tues/Thurs 16/18 Sept): Tennyson's Lady of Shalott: http://d.lib.rochester.edu/camelot/text/tennyson-lady-of-shalott-1842

Reflection Paper #4 (due Thursday 25 September): We encountered many portraits of women (in both art and literature) created by men. Would it be an oversimplification to say that the women were depicted as almost all either “good girls” (mothers, saints, etc.) or “bad girls” (wild women!)? Many argue that these are the only two “types” shown in the media. Do you agree? Why, or why not? Use examples from class lecture notes.

Read for the last full week of September-- Hawthorne's "Rappaccini's Daughter" http://www.shsu.edu/~eng_wpf/authors/Hawthorne/Rappaccini.htm

BOOK DISCUSSION MEETINGS:

In order to succeed in your Book Discussion Meeting you should be able to do the following 5 things:

  1. Tell me roughly what happens in the book (or the part you've read thus far).

  2. Provide me with a thoughtful opinion of the book. This is personal and need not be the same as mine-- HOWEVER, I'm looking for evidence that you've let yourself think about this book a bit.

  3. Connect the book to gender concepts in the class in some way. You can talk about the author if you choose to do outside research on her (in this case email me a rough list of sources you consulted before/ after our meeting), or you can just talk about the book's contents without doing any research for context. Your decision to outside research or not will NOT impact your grade on this assignment. Instead, it is simply a way that some students may feel more comfortable and prepared, depending on their study habits/ learning styles.

  4. Ask me any questions or concerns you have about the book. Questions of signs of confusion are just evidence to me that you've been thinking about things because #5 is....

  5. Answer any questions I have about what you thought of a theme or scene. These will not be about minute details. A sample question based on the Hemingway story: " So, what did you think of the shooting? Do you think she did it deliberately or not?" Then, you would ideally have something to say back to me without going "what shooting?"

We will choose your second book at the meeting so that the second book will complement the first!!!